Play Ball! A Dream Fulfilled.

baseballToss aside the usual notions of baseball being an all-American past time, – because Chicago White Sox pro-scout, Mr. John Tumminia, is taking his baseball clinic to our partners at the Kipkeino Primary School…in Kenya!

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Meet Reverend Francis A. M. Mambu Giving, Not Receiving — A Key to Happiness

mambuThe most compelling thing one would notice about Reverend Mambu when meeting him for the first time is easily his warm smile. A smile that reveals nothing of the horrors and hardships he has witnessed and endured with his fellow Sierra Leoneans over the past decades.

Many are familiar with the notorious civil war that broke out in Sierra Leone during the early 1990s. Although the war technically ‘ended’ in 2002, the consequences for the Sierra Leoneans affect their livelihoods until this day.

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Mozambique and Zimbabwe – Country Information

Click to view Mozambique’s information
Click to view Zimbabwe’s information


mozambique

Mozambiqe – Country Information

Capital:
Maputo

History:
A Portuguese colony for nearly 500 years, Mozambique finally gained independence in 1975. A civil war ensued immediately and lasted until the mid 1990s, ruing any chance of a post-independence flourishing of culture or economy. The ruling Marxist party (and one of the contesting sides in the civil war) had little economic policy success during that time, but since a switch towards more a market oriented ideology in the late 1980s growth has been impressive.

A recent peaceful handover of power gives hope that the days of internal strife are behind Mozambique, and its economic gains has led many to consider it a model success story for aid in sub-Saharan Africa.

Climate:
Mostly tropical; some subtropical

People:
Population – 22,061,451
Median Age – 17.5 years
Population Growth Rate – 1.797%
Life Expectancy – 41.37 years
Literacy – 47.8%
Average Years of Schooling – 9 years (male), 7 years (female)
Urban population – 37%

Languages/Ethnicities/Religions:
Portuguese is the sole official language. Though spoken by only 8.8% of the population natively, 27-40% of the population speak it as a second language.

Emakhuwa 26.1%, Xichangana 11.3%, Elomwe 7.6%, Cisena 6.8%, Echuwabo 5.8%, other Mozambican languages 32%, other foreign languages 0.3%, unspecified 1.3%

African 99.66% (Makhuwa, Tsonga, Lomwe, Sena, and others), Europeans 0.06%, Euro-Africans 0.2%, Indians 0.08%

Catholic 23.8%, Muslim 17.8%, Zionist Christian 17.5%, other 17.8%, none 23.1%

Economy:
GDP per Capita – $900

GDP Composition by Sector:
Agriculture: 24%
Industry: 30.6%
Services: 45.3%

Labor force – by occupation:
Agriculture: 81%
Industry: 6%
Services: 13%

Main Exports:
aluminum, prawns, cashews, cotton, sugar, citrus, timber; bulk electricity

What it is known for:
•  Eco-tourism
•  Beaches

BWA’s Focus Areas in Mozambique:
•  Education
•  Women’s Programs
•  Food Self-Sufficiency
•  Health Care


Zimbabwe – Country Information

zimbabweCapital:
Harare

History:
A series of Shona and later Ndebele empires dominated in the millennium prior to the onset of British colonialism, which began in the 1880s. With most other African nations independent by the mid 1960s, Ian Smith, a white Zimbabwean, unilaterally declared independence from the UK in 1965. He set up a white supremacist government that was effective in maintain economic production (mostly based on agriculture), but bore the brunt of a protracted guerrilla war and economic sanctions.

In 1979, Smith signed a peace treaty with the main rebel movements in the United Kingdom, which allowed for a quick transition to majority rule. However, Robert Mugabe, one of the leaders of the independence movement, has been president since independence and is widely condemned for election rigging, organizing political violence, and overseeing the collapse of the economy in the last decade. The economic collapse is closely related to dispute of land ownership, with an ill-fated attempt to redistribute land away from the white owners (who constitute a very small part of the population but own almost all of the best land) resulting in the fall-off in agricultural productivity. Widespread violence surrounding the disputed 2008 presidential elections has led to a coalition government and a more stable political situation. A new constitution was approved by referendum in March 2013, and new elections are scheduled for later this spring.

Climate:
Tropical

People:
Population – 11,651,858
Median Age – 17.8 years
Population Growth Percentage – 2.954%
Life Expectancy – 47.55 years
Literacy – 90.7%
Average Number of Years of Schooling – 9 years (male and female)
Urban population – 37%

Languages/Ethnicities/Religions:
English is the sole official language and widely spoken. Shona and Sindebele are officially recognized ethnic languages (though there are many others), and one or the other is spoken natively by the vast majority of the population (principally Shona, the language of the largest ethnic group).

The two largest ethnicities are Shona (82%) and Ndebele (14%). There are very small white and Asian minorities.

Mostly Christian, with much influence from traditional beliefs.

Economy:
GDP Per Capita – Less than $100 (2009 est.)

GDP Composition by Sector:
Agriculture: 19%
Industry: 23.9%
Services: 56.9% (2009 EST.)

Labor Force by Occupation:
Agriculture: 66%
Industry: 10%
Services: 24%

Main Exports:
platinum, cotton, tobacco, gold, ferroalloys, textiles/clothing

What it is known for:
Ancient ruins of Great Zimbabwe, Victoria Falls, wildlife

BWA’s Focus Areas in Zimbabwe:
Orphan Care
Women’s Literacy and Empowerment Programs
Health Care
Education

 

Zambia – Country Information

zambiaCapital:
Lusaka

History:
A British colony (under the name Northern Rhodesia) until 1964, Zambia was led until 1991 by President Kenneth Kaunda. Kaunda was a strong supporter of other African independence movements, notably in Angola, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique, as well as staunchly against apartheid in South Africa. Nearly thirty years of fairly despotic rule, along with economic difficulties and increasing calls for democratization, however, forced him to call elections in 1991.

Multi-party democracy has reigned in the country from that year, with overall success. Economic conditions have also improved, in large part due to rising prices of copper and cobalt on the world markets, which combine for 64% of Zambia’s exports.

Climate:
Mostly tropical, variances due to altitude differences

People:
Population – 12,056,923
Median Age – 17.2 years
Population Growth Rate – 1.617%
Life Expectancy – 38.86 years
Literacy – 80.6%
Average Years of Schooling – 7 years (male and female)
Urban population – 35%

Languages/Ethnicities/Religions:

English is the national language, used in schools and for inter-ethnic communication.

However, it is spoken natively by only 1.7% of the population, with the distribution of the rest being:

Bemba 30.1% (official), Nyanja 10.7% (official), Tonga 10.6% (official), Lozi 5.7% (official), Chewa 4.9%, Nsenga 3.4%, Tumbuka 2.5%, Lunda 2.2% (official), Kaonde 2% (official), Lala 2%, Luvale 1.7% (official), other 22.5%

African 99.5% (includes Bemba, Tonga, Chewa, Lozi, Nsenga, Tumbuka, Ngoni, Lala, Kaonde, Lunda, and other African groups), other 0.5% (includes Europeans, Asians, and Americans)

Christian 50%-75%, Muslim and Hindu 24%-49%, indigenous beliefs 1%

Economy:
GDP per Capita – $1,500

GDP Composition by Sector:
Agriculture: 19.2%
Industry: 31.3%
Services: 49.5%

Labor force – by occupation:
Agriculture: 85%
Industry: 6%
Services: 9%

Main Exports:
copper, cobalt, electricity; tobacco, flowers, cotton

What it is known for:
National parks, Wildlife, Victoria Falls

BWA’s Focus Areas in Zambia:
•  Orphan Care
•  Health Care
•  Water Well Development
•  Small-scale Agriculture – Food Self-Sufficiency and Banana Plantations

Zimbabwe – Country Information

zimbabweCapital:
Harare 

History:
A series of Shona and later Ndebele empires dominated in the millennium prior to the onset of British colonialism, which began in the 1880s. With most other African nations independent by the mid 1960s, Ian Smith, a white Zimbabwean, unilaterally declared independence from the UK in 1965. He set up a white supremacist government that was effective in maintain economic production (mostly based on agriculture), but bore the brunt of a protracted guerrilla war and economic sanctions. 

In 1979, Smith signed a peace treaty with the main rebel movements in the United Kingdom, which allowed for a quick transition to majority rule. However, Robert Mugabe, one of the leaders of the independence movement, has been president since independence and is widely condemned for election rigging, organizing political violence, and overseeing the collapse of the economy in the last decade. The economic collapse is closely related to dispute of land ownership, with an ill-fated attempt to redistribute land away from the white owners (who constitute a very small part of the population but own almost all of the best land) resulting in the fall-off in agricultural productivity. Widespread violence surrounding the disputed 2008 presidential elections has led to a coalition government and a marginally more stable political situation. 

Climate:
Tropical 

People:
Population – 11,651,858
Median Age – 17.8 years
Population Growth Percentage – 2.954%
Life Expectancy – 47.55 years
Literacy – 90.7%
Average Number of Years of Schooling – 9 years (male and female)
Urban population – 37% 

Languages/Ethnicities/Religions:
English is the sole official language and widely spoken. Shona and Sindebele are officially recognized ethnic languages (though there are many others), and one or the other is spoken natively by the vast majority of the population (principally Shona, the language of the largest ethnic group).  

The two largest ethnicities are Shona (82%) and Ndebele (14%). There are very small white and Asian minorities. 

Mostly Christian, with much influence from traditional beliefs.   

Economy:
GDP Per Capita – Less than $100 (2009 est.)

GDP Composition by Sector:
Agriculture: 19%
Industry: 23.9%
Services: 56.9% (2009 EST.) 

Labor Force by Occupation:
Agriculture: 66%
Industry: 10%
Services: 24% 

Main Exports:
platinum, cotton, tobacco, gold, ferroalloys, textiles/clothing 

What it is known for:
Ancient ruins of Great Zimbabwe, Victoria Falls, wildlife 

BWA’s Focus Areas in Zimbabwe:
Orphan Care
Women’s Literacy and Empowerment Programs
Health Care
Education

 

Sierra Leone – Country Information

Sierra_LeoneCapital:
Freetown

History:
Inhabited for millennia, Sierra Leone played a key role in the slave trade from its earliest days. Originally controlled by the Portuguese, the area later passed into British hands. The British sent a number of waves of freed slaves to settle around Freetown over the course of the 1800s, and the descendants of whom are known as the Krio ethnic group. 

Since independence, in 1961, the country has experienced a fairly difficult period. Economic troubles have been exacerbated by struggles for control of the diamonds, which were the catalyst for a civil war that lasted throughout the 1990s and resulted in millions of displaced people and tens of thousands of dead. From 2002 the political situation has improved, with two successful democratic elections, and campaigns against corruption appear to be having an effect. 

Climate:
Tropical; hot, humid 

People:
Population – 5,245,695
Median Age – 19 years
Population Growth Rate – 2.216%
Life Expectancy – 55.69 years
Literacy – 35.1%
Average Years of Schooling – 8 years (male), 6 years (female)
Urban population – 38% 

Languages/Ethnicities/Religions:
English is the sole official language, though its regular use is limited to the literate minority. Krio, an English-based Creole, is the national lingua franca. It is the first language of 10% of the population but understood by 95% of Sierra Leoneans. Other regional and/or ethnic languages are typically the native tongues for most people. 

20 African ethnic groups 90% (Temne 30%, Mende 30%, other 30%), Creole (Krio) 10% (descendants of freed Jamaican slaves who were settled in the Freetown area in the late-18th century), refugees from Liberia’s recent civil war, small numbers of Europeans, Lebanese, Pakistanis, and Indians 

Muslim 60%, Christian 10%, indigenous beliefs 30% 

Economy:
GDP per Capita – $900 (2009 EST.) 

GDP Composition by Sector:
Agriculture: 49%
Industry: 31%
Services: 21% (2009 est.) 

Main Exports:
diamonds, rutile, cocoa, coffee, fish 

What it is known for:
Historical relevance to the slave trade (many slaves from all over West Africa left from Freetown to go to the New World), eco-tourism      

BWA’s Focus Areas in Sierra Leone:
Health Care
Education
Food Self-Sufficiency
Vocational Training
Orphan Care