The Faith Healing Agricultural Project in Sierra Leone

The Faith Healing Agricultural Project in Sierra Leone

The Faith Healing Agricultural Project (FHAP) is an offshoot of the longtime partner of Bread and Water for Africa®, Faith Healing Development Organization (FHDO) in Sierra Leone and operates with mission of helping small farmers achieve food security.

FHAP does this in several ways including providing these farmers, the vast majority of whom are women, with materials to help them getting off to a good growing season with quality seeds and planting materials.

In addition, FHAP provides the farmers with hands-on training at its demonstration farm, an established support network and even helps them to prepare their land for planting.

FHAP is making a huge difference in the lives of these women farmers, notes FHDO executive director Rev. Francis Mambu.

During the last planting season, over 78 bushels of rice was planted, he reported. The yield was 806 bushels – a return of more than 10 times!

“From the yield during the last planting season, we were able to support about 330 women farmers in different villages,” said Rev. Mambu, adding, “It is also worth noting that the project distributed rice to vulnerable women in the communities to feed themselves and their families.”

Rev. Mambu and FHAP have also been recognized from the highest levels of the government of Sierra Leone for their efforts.

“The Honourable Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security, Professor Monty Jones thanked FHAP and its partners for the laudable strides they are making in the country, noting that the FHAP rice project is the largest in the entire country,” said Rev. Mambu.

Rev. Mambu noted in the 2018 FHAP Annual Report that about 75 percent of all Sierra Leoneans are engaged in agriculture in one way or another, accounting for approximately 40 percent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product.

“Agriculture is the daily life occupation of most of the people in Sierra Leone, especially for those residing in the rural areas,” he said.

Thanks to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa®, 315 women were provided with micro finance loans to start their own farming businesses for seed loans and also received technical assistance for their farms.

The women farmers reside in the Yankansa village area in the Bombali District in the northern region of the country which suffered greatly during the decade-long civil war in the 1990s when farms and farming equipment was destroyed.

The land is fertile for farming, and the weather is favorable for crops to thrive, but Rev. Mambu and the women he helps continue to face great challenges.

“The people living in Yankansa and other surrounding villages are poor – they don’t have the money to invest in agricultural activities,” he told us. “Even though almost all of these people are engaged in farming, their output is small because of the lack of funds for expansion.”

For the future, Rev. Mambu and FHAP will continue to empower women in villages throughout the Yankansa community.

“These women groups are doing well and their farms are expanding,” he told us. “Hopefully in the next planting season more women groups will be able to register for support.

“Our deep appreciation goes out to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® for their support of FHAP for touching the lives of Sierra Leoneans striving to make better lives for themselves and their families.”

A New Poultry Facility for Sierra Leone

A New Poultry Facility for Sierra Leone

Five thousand chickens is a lot of chickens – especially in an impoverished country such as Sierra Leone. Many go hungry for days on end and chicken is a delicacy compared with the everyday meal of beans and rice.
 
“The evidence suggests that Sierra Leoneans love eating eggs and chicken.”
 
So says Rev. Francis Mambu, executive director of Faith Healing Development Organization (FHDO). We’ve been partnering with them for more than a decade. Together we’ve provided health care services, education and food to tens of thousands children, adults and seniors in the country .
 
“Home-grown” chickens are very much in need in Sierra Leone. As explained by Rev. Mambu: “As the local production is inadequate because of the insufficient number of poultries in the country, most of the chickens and eggs we eat have to be imported from overseas.”
 
But, those imported chickens and eggs “can pose a health challenge” particularly if they are not handled and preserved properly.
 
“A couple of months ago, a whole container load of chickens was dumped as not fit for human consumption,” he told us.
 
We strive to find ways to assist our partners in Africa become self-sufficient while also providing necessary services to the people in the communities they serve.
 
Such as the case in Kenya with the Lewa Children’s Home. The home operates the Baraka Farm providing milk and dairy products to the children, and selling the surplus to help with overhead costs.
 
When Rev. Mambu approached us a couple of years ago with a proposal to construct a facility to house up to 5,000 chickens and food processing area, we were eager to support that initiative.
 
Today, we are proud to announce that the facility is almost ready to start production.
 
The poultry facility will be located on farmland owned by FHDO at Yankansa where other facilities are also located. The facility will be able to serve the people of the capital city of Freetown and provinces.
 
In addition to providing chicken and eggs, profits from the sales will go to supplement revenues for other FHDO projects including schools and low-cost health clinics increase its sustainability. The facility will also provide jobs for several in a country where good jobs are hard to come by.
 
“The need for eggs and chicken cannot be over-emphasized,” Rev. Mambu told us. “These are sources of protein that are affordable by most and the demand therefore is very high.
Sierra Leone Maternal Care:  Meet Mamie Baindu

Sierra Leone Maternal Care: Meet Mamie Baindu

We don’t always realize how fortunate we are that our mothers had access to prenatal services and a hospital to deliver us in. In Sierra Leone, most women give birth alone in their homes with no midwife or medical aid, putting them at serious risk for complications. Many women die during childbirth due to these complications. Sierra Leone boasts one of the lowest life expectancies in the world.

Our partner Faith Healing Development Organization’s (FHDO) clinics in Kenema,Bo, and Rokel and Bunumbu, Sierra Leone are managed by a remarkable woman, Mamie Baindu. She works to provide pregnant and lactating women with services to ensure a safe delivery for mother and child, as well as post-delivery healthcare.

Many years ago, a woman named Ballu came to Mamie after hearing of the high-quality care provided by the clinics. Ballu was facing severe pregnancy complications that could have proved fatal. Thanks to Mamie and her nurses Ballu delivered a healthy baby girl. Ballu’s daughter, Hawa, who is now a grown woman living in the city of Freetown chooses to return to the clinic that saved her mother’s life for her health care.

Today Mamie and her colleagues deliver up to 15 babies per month at their clinics. They also provide 24-hour emergency care to their surrounding communities. The ongoing support by our friends makes the life-saving, and life-giving, operation of these clinics possible.

 

Stories from Sierra Leone – Some of those you’ve helped

Stories from Sierra Leone – Some of those you’ve helped

Over the past few weeks, communities across the globe have been faced with challenge after challenge! Weather emergencies here in the United States and Sierra Leone have hurt so many that live in the path of these destructive storms.

Once again, from all of us at Bread and Water for Africa®, our hearts go out to the people of Sierra Leone.

As many of you know, on August 14, after days of unrelenting rain, a sea of mud and rock came sliding down a hillside into the suburbs of the nation’s capital of Freetown.

Nearly 1,000 are now confirmed dead, and hundreds remain missing. Additionally, 20,000, including 5,000 children, have been displaced.

But your help has made a difference in the lives of those affected. Here are some of the images that just arrived from our local partner, Faith Healing Development Organization, of our efforts to provide medicine and food to thousands.

 

The immediate support our donors provided allowed us to quickly purchase tons of food to distribute to hundreds of families.

Later this week, we will also ship a 20-foot container of medicine and medical supplies, as we know that the suffering will continue for months.

The Disaster and the Aftermath – Sierra Leone Update

The Disaster and the Aftermath – Sierra Leone Update

 

The Disaster

Once again, from all of us at Bread and Water for Africa®, our hearts go out to the people of Sierra Leone.

Sierra Leone has had a history of natural disasters and violence. In the 1990s they suffered through a horrific civil war, then in 2014 the country lost over 4,000 of its citizens from the deadly Ebola virus outbreak leaving the struggling nation, already among the poorest in the world, devastated.

And then, just as the country was returning to some semblance of normalcy, in the early morning hours of August 14, after days of unrelenting rain, a sea of mud and rock came crashing down into the suburbs of the nation’s capital of Freetown. Initial reports stated 500 are confirmed dead, including 150 children, with more than 600 people still missing. In addition, 20,000 inhabitants, including 5,000 children, have been displaced.

Media reports in the days that followed highlighted the harrowing details of the tragedy, including the fact that the worst is yet to come as rain continued, food and medical supplies are low and it is doubtful that there will be any more survivors found, more than doubling the death toll.

The actual number of victims is difficult to know. Given the force of the mudslide, a volunteer told the British news agency that more than a week after the disaster, “We are still finding body parts in the rubble.”

The Children

The most vulnerable are the young children made orphans by this catastrophe.

In an August 24 ABC news report, charities in Sierra Leone (such as Bread and Water for Africa® and our long-time partner, Faith Healing Development Organization (FHDO)) “are grappling with how to help the hundreds of children who have lost parents. It is particularly difficult in a country where just two years ago, a deadly Ebola outbreak decimated many families.”

The Sierra Leone government estimates that at least 4,000 children have been affected and humanitarian aid groups, like Bread and Water for Africa®, are racing to help prevent orphaned children from further trauma.

In addition to the challenges of treating their injuries and providing food and shelter, there is the real fear that child traffickers will be seeking to exploit the situation in Freetown.

“They are especially vulnerable right now,” an aid worker told ABC news. “We saw cases like this during the Ebola outbreak where individuals will come in, say they want to care for a child, take him or her into their home and then abuse them. So we are seeing this as a situation that’s ripe for that kind of exploitation and we want to prevent it.”

According to UNICEF, of the 7,000 people that have registered as being affected by the disaster, 15 percent, or 1050 individuals, are children under the age of 5, with another 40 percent, or 2,800 between the ages of 6 and 18.

“Children have been left homeless, vulnerable and terrified,” stated a UNICEF spokesman. “We must do all we can to protect them from disease and exploitation.”

The Aftermath

Safe drinking water and shelter are the immediate priorities for thousands of people, according to the United Nations.

With destruction and damage to water and sanitation facilities, a major concern for government and health officials is an outbreak of cholera, malaria and other infectious diseases.

The country’s deputy health minister told CNN that some residents have skin infections from the water they are washing in, and officials are putting in place plans for cholera preparedness and prevention.

“We are equipped to a point,” the deputy minister said. “We can’t do it alone.”

The presidential spokesman has appealed for more international aid including medical supplies, shelters, and blankets to help the city recover but warns that there is “a high risk of cholera” with people still living in the devastated areas, without clean water and sanitation.

“We are overstretched,” he told CNN. “We were just on the verge of recuperating after Ebola and the civil war. We are overwhelmed. Sierra Leone is a small country with a small economy and we cannot do this alone…we appeal very passionately to the world to come to our aid.”

The World Health Organization reports that it is working closely with the Sierra Leone government to prevent the spread of malaria, cholera, typhoid and diarrheal conditions in the wake of last week’s mudslides and flooding. Community workers are being trained to recognize the signs of these deadly diseases in areas at risk.

 

What Bread and Water for Africa® is Doing Today

During the deadly Ebola outbreak of 2014, Bread and Water for Africa® was there working hand-in-hand with FHDO in their efforts to provide medicines and food to thousands.

And thanks to our generous supporters, we are there for them once again.

With food and medicine in short supply, we teamed up with our partner, MAP International, to have emergency medicine immediately airlifted to the country.

In addition, we have teamed up with FHDO to provide food and other medical supplies.

With the funding we received from our donors, FHDO Executive Director Rev. Frances Mambu was able to purchase rice, oil and many other food and hygiene items for the injured, hungry and homeless.

And in a few weeks we will be shipping a 20-foot container of more medicines and medical supplies recognizing that the pain and suffering will continue for the months to come.

With sincere thanks to our supporters and partners, Bread and Water for Africa® will be doing all we can to alleviate the suffering of thousands in Sierra Leone.

Devastating  Flooding and Mudslides have hit Sierra Leone

Devastating Flooding and Mudslides have hit Sierra Leone

Devastating flooding and mudslides have hit Sierra Leone washing away entire communities on the outskirts of Freetown.

Bread and Water for Africa® is responding to this emergency. Days of torrential rain have created terrifying mudslides in northern Sierra Leone, where our partner Faith Healing Development Corporation (FHDO) works to provide schooling, health care, and food to the poor. Thousands are feared dead and missing, and Rev. Mambu, FHDO Executive Director, reports that the situation is dire, with children in his care critically injured, and tragically, dying.

Massive flooding has left tens of thousands without shelter. Another deadly outbreak of cholera is a near certainty. We are air-freighting a container of emergency medical supplies tomorrow that can help meet the needs of 20,000 individuals. With the support of our donors, we will send funds to buy bottled water, medical supplies, water purification tablets, and oral rehydration kits. Next week, we will ship tons of disaster relief supplies, including medical, hygiene, and other relief items. Because of the caring and immediate support of our donors and partners, we are able to quickly respond to this crisis to save lives.