Kobby’s Story -Lewa Children’s Home

Kobby’s Story -Lewa Children’s Home

Kobby was abandoned when she was only 7 years old and the first home she can remember was the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret.

“When I came to Lewa Children’s Home, I felt good,” Kobby said. “I attended KipKeino Nursery School and I have continued learning there up to now, where I am in Class 5.”

At Lewa, Kobby has everything she needs.

“I am happy,” she says. “We are fed well every day, we eat a balanced diet, and we are given enough clothes and shoes.

“We are not all the same age, there are small babies brought to the home and I enjoy helping them in the mornings and evenings because I love babies so much.

“In the mornings when we wake up we are well, we play in a clean field, the place where we sleep is clean, we have cupboards to put our clothes, there are toilets.”

In school, her favorite subject is Christian Religious Education where she learns about the Bible and the story of Jesus and his disciples.

“We learn how God created the earth and we learn so many things I can share with others,” she said.

She does acknowledge that some subjects are more challenging for her than others.

“I learn well, but sometimes I can’t understand some subjects,” she told us.

Only a fifth-grader, Kobby already has big dreams for her future.

“When I grow up I want to be a doctor because I want to help those who are sick,” Kobby said. “I want to treat them so that they can enjoy their life again. Even when my family, friends, relatives, and others become sick, I would like to treat them so that they can be healed.”

Kobby has years to make her dream a reality.

For now, she can enjoy being a child without worry or fear for the future thanks to Phyllis.

“I cannot remember when I lived, or my family, but I know my home is the Lewa Children’s Home,” Irene said. “Life here at Lewa is cool and I love being here.”

For Kito… dreams are possible

For Kito… dreams are possible

In 2016, hundreds of students in Africa were able realize their dream of furthering their education through the Bread and Water for Africa® school fees assistance program. Among them is Kito, a Form 2 (sophomore) at the prestigious Kapsabet High School in Kenya, one of the oldest high schools in the country. He was abandoned by his mother at age 2, and along with his older brother and sister. Kito was placed at the Lewa Children’s Home, which receives support from Bread and Water for Africa®. He started his education in nursery school at the age of 4 and studied for 8 years at the Kipkeino Primary School. He now attends the prestigious Kapsabelt High School. His dream for the future? To become a doctor in his homeland. And to Kito, we have no doubt that he won’t let us down. We know there are thousands who don’t have the opportunity to continue their education. His dream is possible because supporters like you help pay his school fees through donations to Bread and Water for Africa®.

Thanksgiving is a much different experience for everyone

Thanksgiving is a much different experience for everyone

Every year on the fourth Thursday of November millions of Americans across the United States gather with their families and friends for a huge turkey dinner with all the trimmings and giving thanks for all the blessings they have received in life.

In sub-Saharan Africa, with the exception of a few Americans residing there, it will be just another day.

But despite the hardships and challenges facing citizens of countries where Bread and Water for Africa® works in partnership with grassroots organizations including Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and elsewhere, there are tens of thousands who have plenty of reason to be thankful.

In 2016 alone:

  • In Cameroon, more than 250 children benefited from the completion of a school, and another 142 orphaned and destitute primary and secondary school students benefited from school fee support.
  • In Ethiopia, 86,000 citizens are thankful for the medical services they received through five hospitals and a clinic supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, while another 12,400 students benefited from a shipment by Bread and Water for Africa® of 22,000 books which was distributed to 20 secondary school libraries.
  • In Kenya, 74 orphaned an abandoned children are thankful to have found a loving home at the Lewa Children’s Home, while another 400 Kenya students from nursery to grade eight benefited from an education provided to them at the KipKeino school, constructed nearly 20 years ago by Bread and Water for Africa®.
  • In Sierra Leone, more than 76,000 residents are grateful for the healthcare services received through hospitals and clinics supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, 3,000 students and local residents benefited from having access to clean, safe water by a well dug by Bread and Water for Africa® on the school grounds, and another 1,006 students are thankful for the education they received at four nurseries, four primary schools and three secondary schools.
  • In Zambia, 93 orphaned children are thankful to have a loving home which provides for all their basic needs and another 146 children living in foster care are grateful for the food support, assistance with school fees and basic health care support they receive.
  • In Zimbabwe, 207 children are thankful for an orphan feeding program supported by Bread and Water for Africa®, while 35 secondary school students are grateful for the opportunity to continue their education through our school fee support program.

But the credit doesn’t belong to us – it goes to you – supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® who without which none of this would be possible.

 

Computers in Kenya: Bridging the Digital Divide And Creating IT Experts

Computers in Kenya: Bridging the Digital Divide And Creating IT Experts

Eldoret, Kenya, pop. 300,000, is the fastest growing city in Kenya, the second largest urban center in Midwestern Kenya and the fifth largest urban center in all of Kenya.

It is a sister city to Indianapolis, IN, Ithaca, NY, Minneapolis, MN, and Portsmouth, VA.

It is also home to the Kipkeino Primary School, and to hundreds of children living in the adjacent Lewa Children’s Home who attend the school.

As millions of children in the United States return to school in upcoming weeks, so do millions of Kenyan children, and as noted by Kipkeino school administrator Vimala Sebastian, “In the modern world of today, a computer lab is a necessity.”

At Bread and Water for Africa® we wholeheartedly agree. That is why, thanks to the generosity of our supporters, we were able in July to fully fund a new computer lab for the school, along with high-speed internet access.

“When the old system was in use, pupils could rarely access the computers and most of the lessons were theory, which was not interesting,” Vimala said. “Right now, they all crowd around the screens which means the children enjoy the program.”

And the biggest strength of the program says Vimala?

“Students being able to use computers and becoming IT experts. They also use the computers for play which improves their cognitive skills as well as alertness.”

As such is true in Indianapolis, Ithaca, Minneapolis, and Portsmouth, so it is true in Eldoret.

Baseball Season Is Now – In Kenya

Baseball Season Is Now – In Kenya

It’s springtime, and young boys and girls will soon be taking to the diamond with their gloves, balls and bats to play what is arguably the most American of sports – baseball.

But these kids aren’t in Cleveland, Chicago or Cincinnati. They live in Eldoret, Kenya.

Most young children in rural Kenya are happy just to have a soccer ball made of plastic bags or rags and twine, but these children who attend the KipKeino Primary School will soon have equipment that would rival any Little League team in the United States thanks to Chicago White Sox scout John Tumminia.

Bread and Water for Africa® is proud to play a role in helping Tumminia and his organization Baseball Miracles introduce the sport to hundreds of children at the KipKeino Primary School this year – we are sure they will have a ball!

This year, Bread and Water for Africa® will be helping to facilitate the clinics and games for dozens of children who will be introduced to America’s pastime by baseball professionals, many of whom will fall in love the sport that they had yet to have even heard of.

And, who knows, perhaps a few years from now we may be watching one of these young Kenyans throwing a fastball, or hitting a homerun, in a Major League Baseball game on TV. We can all dream, right?