Maize for Lewa

Maize for Lewa

 
Corn, or maize as it’s known in Kenya, is a staple food for the residents of the East African country. The maize is grounded into flour to make ugali (imagine grits cooked to the consistency of Playdough). The ugali is eaten with sukuma wiki (collard greens braised with tomatoes, onions and spices) pretty much every day.
 
In fact, millions of children, such as those living at the Lewa Children’s Home, say they don’t feel full after a meal if it doesn’t include a hearty serving of ugali.
 
Each year, the Baraka Farm plants acres and acres of maize which helps keep the bellies full for the orphans at Lewa. The maize also provides feed for the farm’s dairy cows which also provide milk, cheese and more for the children.
 
We are proud of our longtime support to provide a loving home for hundreds of orphaned, abandoned and destitute children at Lewa over the years. We are also proud to assist the Baraka Farm in its mission to providing food for the children, but also generate profits to offset the cost of operating the children’s home.
 
Our International Spokesperson Phyllis Keino, founder, and director of the Lewa Children’s Home also founded the Baraka Farm with the goal of ultimately making the children’s home self-sufficient.
 
Phyllis, who has helped raise hundreds of orphans into successful adults over the years, is “mother” to the 126 children living there presently.
 
In addition to providing corn, milk and more Phyllis notes that the farm does much more for the growing children.
 
“It has also helped instill in the children a good work ethic and teach them the farming skills that are so necessary in a country like Kenya,” she told us.
 
To those who have supported us with their generous gifts over the past two decades enabling us to assist Phyllis in her mission, she has these heartfelt words:
 
“Your generous support has helped provide food, healthcare, clothing and education to poor children like Emmanuel, Otieno, Victoria, Lillian, and so many others – children you will never meet…living halfway around the world in dire conditions.
 
“You have done this with unconditional love, as if they were a member of your family.
 
“God Bless You!
Solar Hot Water Heater System Installed at Lewa Children’s Home

Solar Hot Water Heater System Installed at Lewa Children’s Home

At the Lewa Children’s Home in Kenya, roughly 50 children are provided with everything they need – food, shelter, healthcare, an education and more. They even have electricity, unlike many children in the country, but it comes at a high cost.

To help defray that major expense, thanks to the generosity of long-time supporter, the Landis Family Foundation, we were able to sponsor 50 percent of the cost of equipment and installation of solar panels and hot water heaters this year.

Lewa founder and director, and our international spokesperson Phyllis Keino noted that “This grant will ensure that children of Lewa will have access to hot water as the current installed solar panels are over 10 years old and have stopped working.”

In fact, Kenya and many African countries are “going green” and we are doing our part to take advantage of the tremendous amount of solar power potential available throughout the continent.

As reported recently by Africa.com, Africa has an immense energy crisis with a population of close to 1 billion, there are 625 million people living without power – nearly 70 percent of the population.

“Africa has much greater solar resources available than any other continent because it is the sunniest continent on earth,” notes Africa.com.

Kenya is taking the lead in promoting solar power as more and more of the country’s residents are getting power for the first time, or installing solar panels and reducing or eliminating their dependence on the grid.

In 2017, we installed solar panels on the roof of a clinic in the town of Kericho enabling doctors and staff to have hot water for washing, as well as keeping the facility itself more sanitary.

And three years ago, working with our partner in Sierra Leone, the Christian Health Association of Sierra Leone, we shipped solar panels which were placed on the roofs of clinics and hospitals in the most remote regions of the country where running a power line would be impossible.

Renewable energy technology has the potential to reduce the many of the problems faced throughout the continent and we applaud the fact many small-scale companies and start-ups, such as M-KOPA Solar in Kenya which sells solar home systems to low-income earners, are making large inroads in making green energy available for all.

Kobby’s Story -Lewa Children’s Home

Kobby’s Story -Lewa Children’s Home

Kobby was abandoned when she was only 7 years old and the first home she can remember was the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret.

“When I came to Lewa Children’s Home, I felt good,” Kobby said. “I attended KipKeino Nursery School and I have continued learning there up to now, where I am in Class 5.”

At Lewa, Kobby has everything she needs.

“I am happy,” she says. “We are fed well every day, we eat a balanced diet, and we are given enough clothes and shoes.

“We are not all the same age, there are small babies brought to the home and I enjoy helping them in the mornings and evenings because I love babies so much.

“In the mornings when we wake up we are well, we play in a clean field, the place where we sleep is clean, we have cupboards to put our clothes, there are toilets.”

In school, her favorite subject is Christian Religious Education where she learns about the Bible and the story of Jesus and his disciples.

“We learn how God created the earth and we learn so many things I can share with others,” she said.

She does acknowledge that some subjects are more challenging for her than others.

“I learn well, but sometimes I can’t understand some subjects,” she told us.

Only a fifth-grader, Kobby already has big dreams for her future.

“When I grow up I want to be a doctor because I want to help those who are sick,” Kobby said. “I want to treat them so that they can enjoy their life again. Even when my family, friends, relatives, and others become sick, I would like to treat them so that they can be healed.”

Kobby has years to make her dream a reality.

For now, she can enjoy being a child without worry or fear for the future thanks to Phyllis.

“I cannot remember when I lived, or my family, but I know my home is the Lewa Children’s Home,” Irene said. “Life here at Lewa is cool and I love being here.”

Why solar power?

Why solar power?

You may have heard that we plan to install solar panels at Lewa Children’s Home in Eldoret, Kenya.

But you may be asking yourself, “why solar power?”

The answer is simple. We want to provide a brighter future for African children, and solar power does precisely that for the children of Lewa.

How does solar power help the children of Lewa? 

Energy costs are a big drain on resources that could otherwise be used to provide food, housing, and education to these children. By installing solar panels at the orphanage, energy costs are lowered and thus more resources can be allocated to provide for these critical needs.

To learn more about Lewa Children’s Home, please visit here.

Thank you for all of your support.

The power of Solar Power

The power of Solar Power

Africa is “going green” and we are doing our part to take advantage of the tremendous amount of solar power potential available throughout the continent.

As reported recently by Africa.com, Africa has an immense energy crisis. With a population of close to 1 billion, there are 625 million people living without power – nearly 70 percent of the population.
“Africa has much greater solar resources available than any other continent because it is the… sunniest continent on earth,” notes Africa.com.
Kenya is taking the lead in promoting solar power. More of the country’s residents are getting power for the first time, installing solar panels, and reducing or eliminating their dependence on the grid.

In 2017, we installed solar panels on the roof of a clinic in the town of Kericho enabling doctors and staff to have hot water for washing, as well as keeping the facility itself more sanitary.

Three years ago, working with our partner, the Christian Health Association of Sierra Leone, we shipped solar panels. The panels were placed on the roofs of clinics and hospitals in regions of the country where running a power line would be impossible.

This year, we are hoping to install solar panels on the roof of our long-time partner, the Lewa Children’s Home in Kenya. Although the home for orphans is connected to the country’s electric grid, having the solar panels will reduce their reliance on power from the grid. This reduction will cut their utility costs and free up those funds to benefit the children.

Renewable energy technology has the potential to reduce problems faced throughout the continent. We applaud the fact many small-scale are companies and start-ups, such as M-KOPA Solar in Kenya which sells solar home systems to low-income earners, are making large inroads in making green energy available for all.

Read more at https://www.africa.com/10-renewable-energy-start-ups-africa/

Helping to Battle the Aids Epidemic

Helping to Battle the Aids Epidemic

While the AIDS epidemic may have fallen off the front pages in the United States, it remains an urgent and critical problem around the world – particularly in sub-Saharan Africa – causing millions of children to lose one or both of their parents at a very young age, some tragically born with the virus.

At Bread and Water for Africa® we have not forgotten these children, the continent’s most vulnerable people who have no home, no food, no family and no hope. At children’s homes in Zambia – Kabwata Orphanage and Transit Center; Kenya – Lewa Children’s Home; and Zimbabwe – Shinga Development Trust;  thanks to our supporters hundreds of children have a loving home, the food they need to be healthy and survive, a family with a new-found mother and dozens of brothers and sisters and the hope to see a bright future.

Today, December 1, is the World Health Organizations’ World AIDS Day promoting the theme of “Right to health” highlighting the need for all 36.7 million people living with HIV and those who are vulnerable and affected by the epidemic, to reach the goal of universal health coverage.

Under the slogan, “Everybody counts”, WHO is advocating for access to safe, effective, quality and affordable medicines and health care services for all people in need.

According to WHO, the African region is the most affected region, with 25.6 million people living with HIV in 2016. The Africa region also accounts for almost two-thirds of the global total of new HIV infections.

At Bread and Water for Africa®, thanks to our supporters, we are doing all we can to battle the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa by providing our partner organizations with the medicines and medical supplies and equipment they need to treat the impoverished sick in their communities, as well as provide the basic needs of the casualties of this devastating epidemic – the children who otherwise would be fending for themselves on the streets.