Moye: From Death’s Door to ‘Happily Rejoicing’

Moye: From Death’s Door to ‘Happily Rejoicing’

Moye had been living a happy life in the small Sierra Leonean village of Kojowolo before the deadly Ebola outbreak of 2014 tragically took the lives of his wife and their two children, leaving the 62-widower all alone in the empty house.

He managed to carry on his life without his family until one day earlier this year when he suffered from an acute respiratory tract infection.

After a few days, his condition worsened. Moye knew he needed medical attention, but he continued to suppress his pain because he had no money to pay for treatment.

“Fortunately for him, some of his friends visited him and told him about the Faith Healing Development Organization (FHDO) El Shaddai Clinic in the larger nearby village of Bunumbu and encouraged him to seek medical assistance,” explained FHDO founder and director Rev. Francis Mambu, a long-time partner of Bread and Water for Africa®.

“Moye was transported to the clinic via ‘hamoc’ (a local swing for carrying sick people) as he was unable to walk the seven miles to clinic on his own and the road to Kojowolo is not motorable,” said Rev. Mambu.

“On arrival at the clinic, he was administered antibiotics provided to FHDO by Bread and Water for Africa. After six days in the clinic, Moye recovered fully and was able to walk unaided,” added Rev. Mambu. “The head of the clinic subsequently discharged him and he happily went home rejoicing.”

As for Moye himself, he had a few words of gratitude to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® for preventing what would have been certain death.

“I am now feeling perfectly well with no more difficulty in breathing. Thanks to the FHDO clinic and the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® for saving my life.”

Hope Services’ Hospital in Douala to receive an ultrasound machine and more

Hope Services’ Hospital in Douala to receive an ultrasound machine and more

An obstetric ultrasound is a critical tool in ensuring a fetus is healthy and developing normally – and thanks to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® one is on the way to a newly-opened hospital in Cameroon.

Recently we were proud to announce – again thanks to our generous supporters – that our partner there, Hope Services Ministry International, had just opened a new hospital in Douala with significant financial resources from Bread and Water for Africa® in order to serve tens of thousands of the most needy in the country.

But once that task was completed, the next step was to equip it with the most modern medical equipment possible.

In partnership with New Orleans Medical Mission Services, whose mission is to bring medical equipment and supplies to needy people in foreign countries, we are working to ship a 40-foot container filled with 21,100 pounds of medical supplies.

Among the items are thousands of various types of needles, syringes, tubing, bandages, dressing, gauze, clamps…the list goes on and on.

However, the single most important item in the shipment is a Sequoia ultrasound system, refurbished to be good as new.

With the ultrasound machine, doctors will be able to determine the actual gestational age of the fetus, determine its location, check for the number of fetuses, check for major physical abnormalities, assess fetal growth, detect fetal movements and heartbeat, determine the sex of the baby – and most importantly, confirm fetal viability.

Hope Services’ Bonendale Hospital is able to provide general consultation and emergency services, minor surgeries, laboratory services, deliveries, antenatal care and post-natal counseling, and coming soon will be pediatric services, vaccinations, and major surgical services – all of which are desperately needed in the country.

Hope Services has been providing free and extremely-low cost medical care to the most needy and vulnerable in Cameroon for 25 years through makeshift clinics and outreach programs and now, thanks to people like you is in sight of reaching its true potential.

“Our long term goal has been the extension of medical services in Douala for the benefit of the poor,” says Hope Services founder and director Esther Ndichafah. “This project is a giant step into our long-term goal.”

Hope Services’ Douala Clinic in Cameroon is complete. It needs medical supplies now to treat patients.

Hope Services’ Douala Clinic in Cameroon is complete. It needs medical supplies now to treat patients.

With assistance from Bread and Water for Africa®, our partner organization in Cameroon, Hope Services, was able to construct a clinic in the city of Douala.

And with that project completed we are now on to our task of filling it with the medicines, medical supplies and equipment needed to serve the community.

“The prospective beneficiary community is highly expectant of its start-up and there is a high need for medical equipment,” reported Hope Services director Esther Ndichafah earlier this year.

We are working right now to raise the funds necessary to ship a 40-foot container full of these items in order to enable the people in the surrounding area who are in desperate need of health care services, and we need your help.

Health care, particularly for children and the impoverished, is practically non-existent and Esther reports that the main health challenges facing the country include endemic diseases including malaria, meningitis, cholera, Typhoid fever, and many others most Americans have never even heard of.

“HIV/AIDS also have a high prevalence rate with Douala among the top cities affected,” said Esther. “These diseases require health analysis that require good equipment.”

According to a recent report by the United Nation’s Children’s Fund, few of the poorest women in Cameroon have access to a doctor, nurse or midwife at their side when they need them most, and hundreds of women die every week due complications, while many more live with “debilitating” outcomes.

In addition, the lack of medical attention results in thousands of stillbirths each week, half of them being babies who were alive when labor began, and thousands more die before they are even just one-month-old.

“For far too many families, the sheer cost of childbirth can be catastrophic,” says UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore. “If a family cannot afford these costs, the consequences can even be fatal.

“When families cut corners to reduce maternal health care costs, both mothers and their babies suffer.”

The situation is particularly dire for girls who married before even turning 15 years old. In Cameroon today, more than 60 percent of girls between 20 and 24 have three or more children.

Working with Hope Services, as well as our partners in Sierra Leone, Ethiopia and elsewhere, we are doing what we can to help save infants and their young mothers from premature and preventable deaths.

The cost to gather the medicines and supplies, sort and ship them to Cameroon is not inexpensive. However, it is much cheaper than attempting to acquire them in Cameroon, a daunting task on its own. Using our status as a non-profit organization, the items are allowed into the country duty-free at a substantial cost savings.

Your gift of $25, $50 or even $100 will go a long way towards seeing that the future patients at Hope Services’ Douala clinic get the medicines and supplies they need to treat their illnesses, prevent them from getting sick in the first place, and undoubtedly save lives.

Hope Services has been providing free and extremely-low cost medical care to the most needy and vulnerable in Cameroon for 25 years through makeshift clinics and outreach programs. Now, thanks to people like you, the clinic is in sight of reaching its true potential.

“Our long term goal has been the extension of medical services in Douala for the benefit of the poor,” says Esther. “This project is a giant step into our long-term goal.”

A year in Health Care in Africa

A year in Health Care in Africa

Tragically, millions in sub-Saharan African countries die needlessly every year, particularly young mothers and their infant children. Otherwise healthy children and adults are sickened and die from easily preventable and treatable illnesses due to a lack of safe drinking water and the most basic of medications. We support health care programs in Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, and Sierra Leone.

At Bread and Water for Africa®, thanks to our supporters, we were able to provide medicine and medical equipment to our partners on the ground, who work tirelessly providing around-the-clock care.

In Cameroon, more than 4,000 residents of the city of Yanoundé and the surrounding community benefited from a clinic and hospital operated by our partner there, Hope Services. In addition, with the completion of a clinic in Douala this year, an estimated 60,000 people will have their health needs met.

In Sierra Leone, more than 56,000 people received medical care, counseling, and health education from our partners, Faith Healing Development Organization and Christian Health Services of Sierra Leone, as
well as from United Methodist Church clinics and hospitals.

In Ethiopia, an estimated 10,000 or more people received medical care through the Salae University healthcare program at four hospitals and 11 clinics, using the 40-foot container of donated medical supplies and hospital equipment we shipped this year.

In Kenya, the more than 4,000 people served at the Kebeneti Dispensary will benefit from recently installed solar panels, which provide electricity and hot water.

In Cameroon, more than 4,000 residents of the city of Yanoundé and the surrounding community benefited from a clinic and hospital operated by our partner there, Hope Services. In addition, with the completion of a clinic in Douala this year, an estimated 60,000 people will have their health needs met.

Giving Tuesday: Medical Supplies for the Cameroon

Giving Tuesday: Medical Supplies for the Cameroon

Thanks to the support of African children through your generous gifts to Bread and Water for Africa®, we started funding the construction of a clinic/hospital in Douala about three years ago.

The clinic was supposed to open in May of 2018, but because of the election of the new president in Cameroon and some civil unrest in the north of the country, the opening was delayed.

Now, the clinic is finished and ready to start helping the people of this poor and disease filled country, but before the clinic can help Cameroonian children, we need to send a major shipment of medical supplies and equipment.

Our goal is to raise $20,000 to equip the clinic with medical supplies. Around 30 percent of Douala’s population lives in poverty, and the clinic will serve tens of thousands of mothers and children. They will receive life-lengthening and life-saving treatment there for years to come if we’re successful.

Please know that you absolutely can make a difference on Giving Tuesday in so many ways.

Click here to support medical supplies for Cameroon.