Little Nyarai Finds a Family at the Kabwata Orphanage in Zambia

Little Nyarai Finds a Family at the Kabwata Orphanage in Zambia

Little Nyarai was only two years old when she was brought to Bread and Water for Africa® partner in Zambia, the Kabwata Orphange and Transit Centre.

She is too young to understand why she is there, but old enough to ask “where’s my mommy?

The sad and tragic fact is that her mother was living in a hospital, deathly ill suffering from a terminal illness and was unable to work and care for her daughter.

“There is no other family,” Kabwata Executive Director Angela Miyanda told us.

With no one else in the world to care for this little girl, there’s no telling what her fate would be, what kind of future she would have…or even if she would have a future.

But with the love and care of Angela and her staff, all dedicated to literally saving the lives of hundreds of children in dire circumstances just like Nyarai, after only two months at Kabwata we are thrilled to learn that she is thriving.

“Nyarai had malnutrition which is now clearing off,” Angela reported.

And this little girl who seeming had no hope and future, has both.

Budding Bakers Get Support in Starting Their Own Cake Business in Zambia

Budding Bakers Get Support in Starting Their Own Cake Business in Zambia

In Zambia, Angela Miyanda takes in the country’s most vulnerable children and provides them with a loving home. But equally important is the fact that in doing so, she also prepares them for the day they will walk out when they must be ready to live on their own – much like when it’s time for a fledgling to leave its mother’s nest.

As she tells us, “The Kabwata Orphanage and Transit Centre was formed to provide basic requirements for orphaned and other vulnerable children in Zambia. Through the provision of education, shelter, health, nutrition, love and security we try to help the children reach their full potential in life.”

Most of the children who came to Kabwata to live 10 or 15 years ago are adults who have completed secondary school and are attending colleges and universities, and Angela justifiably takes pride in their success.

But it is the other young adults, those who are not so strong academically, who worry her. She knows they are capable of becoming self-sufficient with assistance in learning a trade.

Surprisingly, she found that four of her “children” had an interest – and an aptitude – for baking and thanks to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® they received the training they needed not just to get a job, but to start their own cake bakery business by assisting them in acquiring the ovens and capital they need to get off the ground.

“This is a project that targets older children who leave Kabwata for reintegration back into society,” explained Angela. “This project believes this gesture to the youth will make a big impact on encouraging even those who have not made it academically.”

What a life it has been for Emmanuel!

What a life it has been for Emmanuel!

We at Bread and Water for Africa® began to get to know him as a 2-year-old toddler when he was brought to the Lewa Children’s Home in Eldoret, Kenya, and into the loving arms of Lewa founder and executive director Phyllis Keino after being abandoned by his mother.

Even at that tender age, Phyllis, who has become known as “mother” to hundreds of orphaned and abandoned children and who all have a special place in her heart could tell there was something exceptional about Emmanuel.

15 years ago, Emmanuel arrived at Lewa with his older brother and sister, and it didn’t take long for them to become a part of the Lewa family, and for Phyllis to become the only mother he has ever known.

While most children in Kenya, and throughout the African continent for that matter, want nothing more than to be able to go to school in the knowledge that getting an education is their only chance out of a life of dire poverty, for Emmanuel, it was not just attending school – but excelling the classroom – that was his passion.

Emmanuel attended Kip Keino Primary School from Nursery to Jr. High, and in 2015, as an eighth grader, Emmanuel tackled his biggest challenge yet by scoring among the best and brightest throughout the entire country in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) examinations (similar to the SAT for high school students in the United States).

It is especially tragic for those who have the ability and determination but lack the money for school supplies and uniforms and have no choice but to take menial low-wage jobs to help support their families and themselves.

While of course we cannot say what was going through Emmanuel’s mind as he filled out his application for Kapsabet High School, we must assume it was with hopeful optimism. Kapsabet is one of the most prestigious high schools in the country whose alumni include Daniel Arap Moi, the second president of Kenya.

The odds against him being accepted to Kapsabet – (where only 300 new students are accepted each year – out of an application pool of 60,000!) – were long, but as his acceptance to the class of 2019 illustrates, not insurmountable.

For Emmanuel, beating those seemingly overwhelming odds was not a matter of luck, but a testament to his ability, and his steady belief that he can do whatever he sets his mind to.

Four years later, we have just received word from Phyllis that Emmanuel is headed to Taita Taveta University in Mariwenyi, Kenya – on a full scholarship!

Taita Taveta University, a non-profit public higher education institution accredited by the Commission for University Education of Kenya, is described as “A Premier Institution in Education, Training, Research, Innovation And Community Outreach.”

Beginning in August, Emmanuel will begin his studies, majoring in agribusiness; a vital field on the African continent as noted by a recent report by the World Bank on “Agribusiness Indicators: Kenya” which states:

“The importance of agriculture in the economies of sub-Saharan African countries cannot be overemphasized.

 

“With agriculture accounting for about 65 percent of the region’s employment and 75 percent of its domestic trade, significant progress in reducing hunger and poverty across the region depends on the development and transformation of the agricultural sector.

 

“Transforming agriculture from largely a subsistence enterprise to a profitable commercial venture is the prerequisite and driving force for accelerated development and sustainable economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa.”

We have no doubt that one day in the not-too-distant future, Emmanuel – the same 2-year-old helpless child abandoned by his mother – will be leading the way as a driving force in helping to reduce hunger and poverty, perhaps even at the Baraka Farm right next to the Lewa Children’s Home where he grew up.

Despite all Emmanuel has accomplished, we know he will never forget those who helped him attain the success he has achieved today – namely Phyllis, and the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa®. Without them, he would not have had a home, much less an education.

Upon his acceptance to Kapsabet in 2015, he expressed his sincere gratitude in a letter to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® writing:

“I write this letter to really appreciate for sponsoring me – for if it wouldn’t have been for you, I wouldn’t be where I am.

 

“This comes from the bottom of my heart. I promise to work hard at school and post good results as hard work pays.

 

“Moreover, I promise to not let you down.”

The town of Mariwenyi is 400 miles, a 12-hour bus ride on the rutted Kenyan roads, from Lewa where he grew up, but a world away from how his life began and how we are certain it will evolve.

Wilson, Samuel and Joseph: Three Abandoned Brothers Find Love in Phyllis’ Arms

Wilson, Samuel and Joseph: Three Abandoned Brothers Find Love in Phyllis’ Arms

For one brief, heartbreaking period in their young lives all that the three brothers Wilson, Samuel and Joseph had was themselves after unbelievably being abandoned by their mother.

And it was on a dark, rainy evening in Kenya when a neighbor heard their desperate crying that a concerned, compassionate neighbor came to their rescue.

Though she tried to locate the boys’ mother, she was nowhere to be found – and with nowhere else to turn, the woman brought Wilson, Samuel and Joseph into the loving, welcoming arms of Phyllis Keino, the founder and director of the Lewa Children’s Home, a longtime partner of Bread and Water for Africa®.

“On arrival, they were weak, hungry and very malnourished,” Phyllis told us. “They came with many ailments.”

In addition, never having been to school, they could neither read nor write and showed signs of being mentally challenged.

Phyllis does not select the orphaned and abandoned children who are brought to her. Whether this is by government officials, the police because their parent(s) are in prison, or caring citizens, she instantly gives them her love as if each is one of her own, because from that moment on they are.

The horrors of their past lives are thankfully unknown, but what is known is that these three boys have a present filled with a love they have likely never known, the basic necessities of life including health care and an education, and hope for a long life and a bright future – thanks to Phyllis and the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa®.